Tuesday, April 23, 2013

South Africa Facing White Genocide… Total Communist Takeover!

While most of the world refuses to acknowledge what is happening in largely communist-controlled South Africa, the non-profit group Genocide Watch declared last month that preparations for genocidal atrocities against white South African farmers were underway and that the early phases of genocide had possibly already begun. In the long run, Genocide Watch chief Dr. Gregory Stanton explained, powerful communist forces also hope to abolish private-property ownership and crush all potential resistance.
According to experts and official figures, at least 3,000 white farmers in South Africa, known as Boers, have been brutally massacred over the last decade. Many more, including children and even infants, have also been raped or tortured so savagely that mere words could not possibly convey the horror. And the problem is growing worse, international human rights monitors and South African exiles say.
The South African government, dominated by the communist-backed African National Congress (ANC), has responded to the surging wave of racist murders by denying the phenomenon, implausibly claiming that many of the attacks are simply regular crimes. Despite fierce criticism, authorities also stopped tracking statistics that would provide a more accurate picture of what is truly going on in the so-called “Rainbow Nation.”
In many cases, the murders are simply classified as “burglaries” and ignored, so the true murder figures are certainly much higher than officials admit. The police, meanwhile, are often involved in the murders or at least the cover-ups, multiple sources report. A white South African exile living in the United States told The New American that when victims are able to defend themselves or apprehend the would-be perpetrators, many of the perpetrators are found to be affiliated with the ruling ANC or its youth wing.
Experts are not buying the government’s cover-up. “The farm murders, we have become convinced, are not accidental,” said Dr. Stanton of Genocide Watch during a fact-finding mission to South Africa last month. It was very clear that the massacres were not common crimes, he added — especially because of the absolute barbarity used against the victims. “We don’t know exactly who is planning them yet, but what we are calling for is an international investigation that will try and determine who is planning these murders.”
Indeed, most honest analysts concede that the thousands of brutal killings and tens of thousands of attacks are part of a broader pattern. And according to Dr. Stanton, who was also involved in the anti-Apartheid movement in South Africa and has decades of experience examining genocide and communist terror, the trend points toward a troubled future for the nation.
“Things of this sort are what I have seen before in other genocides,” he said of the murdered white farmers, pointing to several examples including a victim’s body that was left with an open Bible on top and other murder victims who were tortured, disemboweled, raped, or worse. “This is what has happened in Burundi, it’s what happened in Rwanda. It has happened in many other places in the world.”

Genocide Watch following developments in South Africa

March 21, 2013
“…best described by an Afrikaner farm owner: “It’s politically correct to kill whites these days.”
A victim of an attack
In July of 2012, Dr. Gregory Stanton, head of the nonprofit group Genocide Watch, conducted a fact-finding mission in South Africa. He concluded that there is a coordinated campaign of genocide being conducted against white farmers, known as Boers. “The farm murders, we have become convinced, are not accidental,” Stanton contended. “It was very clear that the massacres were not common crimes,” he added—especially because of the absolute barbarity used against the victims. “We don’t know exactly who is planning them yet, but what we are calling for is an international investigation,” he added.
The number of farm murders, or “plaasmoorde” as it is called in Afrikaans, is staggering. Over the last decade, it is estimated that at least 3000 Boers have been killed.
What is known is that the ANC celebrated in 100th year anniversary with a song led by President Zuma himself. “Dubula iBhunu” or “Shoot the Boer” was a line in the lyrics of an apartheid-era song,
Dr. Stanton concluded that Malema’s revival of a song advocating murder moved South Africa from the fifth stage on his genocidal scale to stage six. When the South African judiciary ruled it to be unlawful hate speech, Genocide Watch put South Africa back at stage five. When President Zuma was caught on tape January 2012 singing, “We are going to shoot them with the machine gun, they are going to run/You are a Boer, we are going to hit them, and you are going to run/shoot the Boer…” South Africa was raised to stage six once again.
Stage six is known as Preparation: “Victims are identified and separated out because of their ethnic or religious identity. Death lists are drawn up. Members of victim groups are forced to wear identifying symbols. Their property is expropriated. They are often segregated into ghettoes, deported into concentration camps, or confined to a famine-struck region and starved.”
The sixth stage is followed by stage seven: Extermination.

and as Genocide Watch noted on its website last July one more step was taken as well. “The government has disbanded the commando units of white farmers that once protected their farms, and has passed laws to confiscate the farmers’ weapons,” it reported. “Disarmament of a targeted group is one of the surest early warning signs of future genocidal killings.””
South Africa – Official Hate Speech
Stage 5:  Polarization
By Genocide Watch -
12 July 2012
The African National Congress has been South Africa’s governing party since the Presidency of Nelson Mandela 17 years ago, following the end of white minority rule and apartheid.  In the years under apartheid, hate speech was used by both supporters and opponents of the apartheid system to stir up their followers.  When racial tensions in South Africa ran high, the song “Kill the Farmer, Shoot the Boer” was a revolutionary song of the anti-apartheid movement.  However, it is an illustration of the long-term impact that such de-humanizing language can have.
After many years when such songs were no longer sung, in 2010, prominent members of the ANC Youth League, in particular Julius Malema, President of the ANC Youth League, openly sang the “Shoot the Boer” song at ANC Youth League rallies.  Not only did revival of the song strike fear into the hearts of Boer farmers, but it has actually been sung during attacks on white farmers. It is an incitement to murder white Afrikaner farmers.
Over 3000 white farmers have been murdered since 1994. The South African police have not made investigation and prosecution of these farm murders a priority, dismissing them as crimes by common criminals.  The government has disbanded the commando units of white farmers that once protected their farms, and has passed laws to confiscate the farmers’ weapons.  Disarmament of a targeted group is one of the surest early warning signs of future genocidal killings. 
A recent outbreak of violent farm invasions has led to casualties among white South Africans. The farm invasions are direct results of calls by Julius Malema and his Deputy, Ronald Lamola for whites to give up their land without compensation, or face violence by angry black youths “flooding their farms.”
In response to Julius Malema, the Freedom Front (FF) cited Section 16.2c of the South African Constitution, which restricts freedom of speech rights by excluding as unprotected speech "advocacy of hatred based on race, ethnicity, gender or religion and incitement to cause harm.” The FF contended that Malema’s singing of the “Shoot the Boer” song was hate speech and therefore a human rights violation. Acting Judge of the South Gauteng High Court, Leon Halgryn declared that the song is hate speech, and it is unconstitutional to either utter or sing “dubul’ibhunu” (“shoot the Boer.”) He issued an injunction against Malema, ordering him to no longer sing the song. The phrase is now considered hate speech.
Julius Malema was shortly thereafter removed as President of the ANC Youth League, and ejected from the ANC.  However, Malema’s followers have defied the judgment and continue to sing the song. Even
President Jacob Zuma sang “Shoot the Boer” at the ANC Centenary Celebration event in January of 2012.  He claimed that its use at the ANC Centenary was not intended as hate speech, but rather to commemorate the struggle against apartheid.
Despite President Zuma’s proclaimed intent, his singing of the song may be contributing to an increasingly hostile environment that threatens the safety of white South Africans.  The number of murders of Boer farmers has increased each month in 2012.
For ten years, Genocide Watch has been the only international human rights group willing to declare an Alert about the high murder rate of Boer farmers, perhaps because it is not “politically correct” to defend the rights of people who once supported apartheid. Genocide Watch is opposed to all forms of racism, from whatever the source. The President of Genocide Watch actively supported the anti-apartheid movement in constitutional consultations with the United Democratic Front when he was a Fulbright Professor of Law in Swaziland.  He has visited South Africa several times since and will soon visit again.
According to the Genocide Watch 8 stages of Genocide, South Africa remains at stage 5:  Polarization.
 Update April 16 2013:
Nobel Peace Laureate Nelson Mandela’s bombs: for the record: 

SA exile Henri le Riche writes: “Other than the ANC siding with the communists during the Cold War, why did UK prime minister Margaret Thatcher and US president Ronald Reagan call the ANC a terrorist organisation?
— I will let the current US president, Barrack Obama, answer that question. After the April 16 2013 bombing at the Boston Marathon he said: “Any Time Bombs Are Used to Target CIVILIANS It Is an Act of Terror”.

The ANC had an easy choice: Fight soldiers, or take the easy cowardly option terrorists worldwide take,and that is target civilians..

1981 – 2 car bombs at Durban showrooms
1983 – Church Street Bomb (killed 19, wounded 217)
1984 – Durban car bomb (killed 5, wounded 27)
1985-1987 – At least 150 landmines on farm roads (killed 125)
1985 – Amanzimtoti shopping centre bomb (killed 5 people, including 3 children)
1986 – Magoo’s Bar bomb (killed 3, wounded 69)
1986 – Newcastle Court bomb (wounded 24)
1987 – Johannesburg Court bomb (killed 3, wounded 10)
1987 – Wits command centre car bomb (killed 1, wounded 68)
1988 – Johannesburg video arcade (killed 1 unborn baby, wounded 10)
1988 – Roodepoort bank bomb (killed 4, wounded 18)
1988 – Pretoria Police housing unit, 2 bombs (wounded 3)
1988 – Magistrate’s Court bomb (killed 3)
1988 – Benoni Wimpy Bar bomb (killed 1, wounded 56)
1988 – Witbank shopping centre bomb (killed 2, wounded 42)
1988 – Ellis Park Rugby Stadium car bomb (killed 2, wounded 37)
Late 1980s – numerous Wimpy Restaurant bombs (killed many, wounded many)

 Background to Nelson Mandela’s bombs:
For the testimony submitted to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission by the terrorists themselves about the war they waged against the peoples of South Africa, view the TRC website – but also note that Nelson Mandela has never personally had to testify about his role in approving of these atrocities. Historians now say that Tutu’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission was only set up to ‘protect the terrorists’: only 23 percent of the applications for amnesty came from security forces. (table below)

 21,000 victims of these atrocities testified, 849 people received amnesty, 5,392 people were refused amnesty:

The TRC took the testimony of approximately 21,000 victims; and 2,000 of them appeared at public hearings. The commission received 7,112 amnesty applications. Amnesty was granted in 849 cases and refused in 5,392 cases, while other applications were withdrawn. http://www.doj.gov.za/trc/amntrans/index.htm

In his book,” Long Walk to Freedom”, Mandela writes that as a leading member of the ANC’s executive committee, (and as has since then become known but kept secret during the ‘transition period’, he was also a leading executive of the SA Communist Party) he had “personally signed off” in approving these acts of terrorism – the results of which can be seen below.  So look at these scenes on the pictures and videos below to view exactly what  Mandela had “signed off” for while he was in prison – after he was convicted for other acts of terrorism after the Rivonia trial. 
The late SA president P.W. Botha told Mandela in 1985 that he could be a free man as long as he did just one thing: ‘publicly renounce violence’. Mandela refused. That is why Mandela remained in prison until the appeaser Pres F.W. de Klerk freed him unconditionally. The bottom line is that Nelson Mandela never publicly renounced violence.
When Mandela was arrested on his Rivonia farm hideout near Johannesburg, the following munitions and bomb-making equipment were confiscated with him and his courageous comrades.
(Read his ‘Rivonia trial’  transcripts for all the details, starting with his heroic opening statement: “I am prepared to die…’ :http://www.anc.org.za/ancdocs/history/rivonia.html  – clearly he didn’t care whether all those innocent civilians whose tortured and mutilated bodies can be seen below, died either)
  • 210,000 hand grenades

  • 48,000 anti-personnel mines

  • 1,500 time devices

  • 144 tons of ammonium nitrate

  • 21,6 tons of aluminium powder

  • 1 ton of black powder